Insects July CP

A short trip to Central Park netted these insects. I spotted these at the south end of the lake where there is a wildflower patch and nature trail. The excellent entomologists at www.bugguide.net helped me identify the Drone Fly. The rest I figured out on my own.

Drone Fly (Eristalis arbustorum) female, Central Park 7/26/2017
Drone Fly (Eristalis arbustorum) female, Central Park 7/26/2017
American Snout Butterfly (Libytheana carinenta), Central Park 7/26/2017
American Snout Butterfly (Libytheana carinenta), Central Park 7/26/2017
Spot-winged Glider (Pantala hymenaea), Central Park 7/26/2017
Spot-winged Glider (Pantala hymenaea), Central Park 7/26/2017
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) male, Central Park 7/26/20
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) male, Central Park 7/26/20
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) female, Central Park 7/26/
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) female, Central Park 7/26/20

Insects CP July

Went to Central Park yesterday. It was hot so I moved slowly. I dusted the small bee-like fly (only 5 mm) with stars, the rest are as photographed.

Early Fall – Central Park

Northern Cardinal, Central Park 9/10/2016
Northern Cardinal, Central Park 9/10/2016
American Robin, Central Park 9/10/2016
American Robin, Central Park 9/10/2016
American Robin, Central Park 9/10/2016
American Robin, Central Park 9/10/2016
Swainson's Thrush, Central Park 9/12/2016
Swainson’s Thrush, Central Park 9/12/2016
Red-eyed Vireo, Central Park 9/12/2016
Red-eyed Vireo, Central Park 9/12/2016
Eastern Wood-Peewee, Central Park 9/12/2016
Eastern Wood-Peewee, Central Park 9/12/2016
Eastern Wood-Peewee, Central Park 9/12/2016
Eastern Wood-Peewee, Central Park 9/12/2016
Eastern Phoebe on a Catalpa Tree, Central Park 9/16/2016
Eastern Phoebe on a Catalpa Tree, Central Park 9/16/2016
American Goldfinch, Central Prak 9/16/2016
American Goldfinch, Central Prak 9/16/2016
20160916_central-pk_21
Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) in a London Plane Tree, Central Park 9/16/2016
Web, Central Park 9/12/2016
Web, Central Park 9/12/2016
Yellow Buckeye (Aesculus flava), Central Park 9/10/2016
Yellow Buckeye (Aesculus flava), Central Park 9/10/2016

Battery Park 1 of 2

Located at the southern tip of Manhattan by the harbor and the confluence of the East and Hudson Rivers, Battery Park is where the history of New York City began. The Native Americans called it Capske Hook (from Kapsee, an Indian term for rocky ledge). The  Dutch West India Company began the settlement of New Amsterdam in 1625 nearby. The Dutch built Fort Amsterdam around 1626, and by 1689 the first of a series of gun batteries was installed.

Fort George (formerly Fort Amsterdam) was demolished in 1788. From 1808 to 1811, a circular fort known as the West Battery was erected 200 feet offshore, in anticipation of the war of 1812. It was renamed Castle Clinton in 1815 and ceded to the City in 1823.

Much of the present park is on landfill. In this way the park was extended further  from 1823 to 1872. By 1855. Successive landfills had enlarged the Park to encompass Castle Garden and the structure became America’s first immigrant receiving center from 1855 to 1890, welcoming 8.5 million people before the establishment of Ellis Island.

The Battery was a popular place for New Yorkers to visit in the early 18th century. The old fort, renamed Castle Garden, provided the setting for receptions, demonstrations, and performances. General Lafayette was welcomed there in 1824 and Hungarian patriot Lajos Kossuth in 1851. Samuel F.B. Morse demonstrated his “wireless telegraph” in 1842, and singer Jenny Lind in 1850.

Castle Clinton was the New York Aquarium from 1896 to 1941.

Much of Battery Park was closed from 1940 to 1952, while the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel and the Battery Park Underpass was built. The park was landscaped and expanded by two acres, after a delay caused by WWII.

Following its near–total demolition by Robert Moses in 1941, resulting in a major preservation battle, the original fort walls were declared a National Monument by an Act of Congress in 1946. Castle Clinton was ceded to the U.S. Department of the Interior in 1950 and designated a national monument. In 1982 New York State designated Battery Park as a part of Harbor Park, a group of historic waterfront sites.

Battery Park monuments: Peter Minuit Plaza was added in 1955 and East Coast Memorial in 1963. In 1995 an American Linden (Tilia Americana) tree was planted as a tribute to singer Jenny Lind (1820-1887), whose performance at Castle Garden on September 11, 1850 was billed as the musical event of the century. Thanks to promoter P.T. Barnum, the arrival of the “Swedish Nightingale” caused a sensation in New York.

Restored to its fortification appearance by the National Park Service in 1975, the Castle currently houses a small interpretive display and the ticket office for the Statue of Liberty – Ellis Island ferry. Over three million visitors pass through its walls annually.

SeaGlass Carousel

While the Battery Conservancy was designing the park’s interior to reflect its rich history an aquatic carousel was proposed to recall 1896, when The Battery was the first home of the New York Aquarium. SeaGlass was designed by wxy architecture. The shape is inspired by the chambered nautilus. The spiraling pavilion of glass and steel brings art, architecture, music, and film to children of all ages. George Tsypin Opera Factory creates a mystical underwater experience. The rider sits within iridescent fish that glides through the sights and sounds of a 360° aquatic adventure.

More information and sources: NYC Parks,  Battery Conservancy and images of the Battery before and after.

Battery Park 2 of 2

Insects and

I went to Central Park with only my Nikor-Micro f2.8 105mm G lens on my D750 to photograph small things. After throwing out almost all of them I am left with these. I apologize for the poor quality of a few but I included them because I am so proud of myself for identifying them.

Wave Hill 2 of 3

Wave Hill is a peaceful and tranquil place.

Delicate blue, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016

Soft pink, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Soft pink, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
White with colored c ednters, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
White with colored c ednters, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Lavender colored flower, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Lavender colored flower, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Magnolia spcs., Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Magnolia spcs., Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Pea family, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Pea family, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Fuzzy pods, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Fuzzy pods, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Bee yellow, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Bee yellow, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Ladybugs, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Ladybugs, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Cabbage White (Pieris rapae), Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Cabbage White (Pieris rapae), Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Flower fly, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Flower fly, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Roses and bee, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016
Roses and bee, Wave Hill, NY 6/15/2016

Insects and Flowers

Lots of insects are all out taking advantage of the flowers and greenery in June. I pulled in a few from previous years to illustrate a few common species. Insects are tricky, I often use BugGuide.net to get help identifying them.

I found a nice simple guide: A Pictorial Guide to Some Common Bees of the New York City Metropolitan Area (Images and descriptions compiled by Kevin C. Matteson).