May Birds 2

Last one of a set of 4 posts. The Grey Catbirds arrived in what seemed like one day. The little female Scarlet Tanager looks exhausted by the journey. It is getting very hot, time for baths. On May 16th, there was a huge termite hatch out in New York after the rains. This coincided with a record number of warblers (did they know this?). A feast was had by all. This starling kept coming for beakfulls at a time for its family. The bullfrog may have been hoping for a careless warbler to fly by.

May Birds 1

These are some of the larger migrants. Some will stay. Blue Jays are in Central Park year-round. I managed to capture a liquid drop at the end of the Oriole’s bill while it was feeding on the Tulip Tree blossoms. Nighthawks are rarely seen. Word got out, and we flocked to see it in a tree overlooking Azalea Pond.

 

May Warblers 2

Here is the second set. I need to get out there and photograph some more before Spring migration is over.

May Warblers 1

Tuseday this week was the best day for Spring warblers in Central Park. I will post my May photographs over the next few days. Hope you enjoy them.

 

Blue Grosbeak

A Blue Grosbeak (probably first year) has been staying by the bee hives in Battery Park, New York City this week. I was lucky, I didn’t nead to search or wait, there it was. The bird looks a bit scruffy and feather worn, but seems to be surviving well by bashing bees to death and eating them.

Second of May Birds

I saw these birds on the same day as the Red-headed Woodpecker (previous post) in the Ramble, Central Park, NYC. The first one is a composite I created of a bird in a series—like a mini movie left to right. Click on the image to view larger.

Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Central Park 5/2/2017
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (composite), Central Park 5/2/2017
Northern Cardinal, Central Park 5/2/2017
Northern Cardinal, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-winged Blackbird, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-winged Blackbird, Central Park 5/2/2017
Great Crested Flycatcher, Central Park 5/2/2017
Great Crested Flycatcher, Central Park 5/2/2017
Eastern Kingbird, Cenral Park 5/2/2017
Eastern Kingbird, Cenral Park 5/2/2017
Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Central Park 5/2/2017
Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-breated Grosbeak, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-breated Grosbeak, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-breated Grosbeak, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-breated Grosbeak, Central Park 5/2/2017

Red-headed

This somewhat rare bird of Central Park has been very popular recently. Birders in the park have enjoyed sitting by the feeders in the Ramble, talking about the bird and photographing it. There is young Red-headed Woodpecker near 72nd Street on the East side of Central Park that has been there all winter. Neither bird has found a mate.

I took these with my Nikon D750 with a Sigma 150-600 mm lens. the ones that show two birds in a picture are composites.

Red-headed Woodpecker, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker compisite, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker, Central Park 5/2/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker comp;osite, Central Park 5/2/2017