Cranach-Hofe

The Cranachhöfe documents the work of Lucas Cranach the Elder, Lucas Cranach the Younger, Hans Cranach,Augustin Cranach and Lucas Cranach III in Wittenberg. The building at Markt 4 and the pharmacy with courtyard at Schlossstraße 1 is where Lucas Cranach and his descendants lived and worked. Lucas Cranach the Elder had set up the printing room in the Cranachhof in the once famous printing town of Wittenberg. He printed the 95 Theses, the first part of the Luther Bible, Luther’s table speeches and numerous woodcuts were printed there too. After the reconstruction of the Cranachhöfe, a historic printing room was again set up in Schlossstrasse, in which texts (Luther’s table speeches) and illustrations (in linocut) are now produced using the book high-print process. On special occasions, the historic Gutenberg Press at Cranachhof Markt 4 will be activated to demonstrate how printing was done during the Middle Ages.

For some of his artwork see Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472–1553) in the Lucas Cranach Digital Archive. I like his partridges (with audio) shown at Lucas Cranach the Elder | Dresden | The Morgan Library. Here’s the site for The Cranach Foundation (cranach-stiftung.de) with loads information on the history of the two houses and the exhibits.

I thoroughly enjoyed Wittenberg. It is well worth a visiting. It would be nice to see more of it someday.

Wittenberg Market Square

Lutherstadt Wittenberg is a fascinating historical town and was the home of Martin Luther Martin Luther and the artist Lucas Cranach the Elder Lucas Cranach.

From Lutherstadt Wittenberg in Wikipedia: “Old Town Hall and Market Square. In the center of the old town is the generously dimensioned market square, where a harmonious ensemble of town houses has grown over centuries. On it are the Renaissance town hall, the monuments of Martin Luther (designed by Schadow) and Philipp Melanchthon as well as the market fountain. Since 2000, the city administration is in the former Tauentzienkaserne in Lutherstraße (New Town Hall), the town hall on the market square is called Altes Rathaus and has since served more representative purposes.”

It will a few more posts to share some of the photographs I made in Wittenberg on October 15, 2021.

In the top three photographs I replaced the skies.

Schloss Lubbenau

The manor or castle at Schloss (Castle) Lubbenau is now a fancy hotel and restaurant. We spent an afternoon on our own and ate lunch there on October 14th.

“Surrounded by rivers, the nine-hectare Laridschaftgarten encloses the entire historic castle ensemble on natural pasture. The park is one of the early designs of English garden art in Lower Lusatia.”

Berlin

We took the train into Berlin for a day. We went to one museum. I forgot my camera in the car in Lübben so all of these are cellphone shots.

Senftenberg

Senftenberg – Wikipedia

“Senftenberg is a town in southern Brandenburg, Germany, capital of the Oberspreewald-Lausitz district. is located in the southwest of the historic Lower Lusatia region at the border with Saxony. Its town centre is situated north of the river Black Elster and the artificial Senftenberger Lake, part of the Lusatian Lake District chain, approximately 20 kilometres (12 mi) northwest of Hoyerswerda, and 35 kilometres (22 mi) southwest of Cottbus.

Senftenberg was first mentioned in a 1279 deed issued by Henry III the Illustrious of Wettin, then margrave of Lusatia. With Lower Lusatia, the settlement was acquired by the Kingdom of Bohemia under Charles IV of Luxembourg in 1368. Elector Frederick II of Saxony acquired Senftenberg in 1448, whereafter the area as a border stronghold of the House of Wettin was separated from Bohemian Lusatia, until in 1635 all Lusatian territories fell to Saxony by the Peace of Prague. According to the 1815 Congress of Vienna, Lower Lusatia was annexed by Prussia and incorporated into the Province of Brandenburg.”