Cottbus

We went with the family to Cottbus. We saw an art museum there with lovely art about miners. No photographs allowed. The town has an intersting history.

The following is from Wikipedia (Cottbus – Wikipedia). “Cottbus is a university city and the second-largest city in Brandenburg, Germany. Situated around 125 km (78 mi) southeast of Berlin, on the River Spree, Cottbus is also a major railway junction with extensive sidings/depots. Although only a small Sorbian minority lives in Cottbus itself, the city is considered as the political and cultural center of the Sorbs in Lower Lusatia.

The settlement was established in the 10th century, when Sorbs erected a castle on a sandy island in the River Spree. The first recorded mention of the town’s name was in 1156. In the 13th century German settlers came to the town and thereafter lived side by side with the Sorbs. In the Middle Ages Cottbus was known for wool, and the town’s drapery was exported throughout Brandenburg, Bohemia (Czechia) and Saxony. In 1445 Cottbus was acquired by the Margraviate of Brandenburg from Bohemia. In 1514 Jan Rak founded the Universitas Serborum, a Sorbian gymnasium, in the city. In 1701 the city became part of the Kingdom of Prussia. It was also ruled by Saxony between 1807 and 1813. In 1815 the surrounding district of Lower Lusatia was ceded by the Kingdom of Saxony to Prussia, and in 1871 it became part of the German Empire. According to the Prussian census of 1905, the city of Cottbus had a population of 46,270, of which 97% were Germans, 2% were Sorbs and 1% were Poles.

In interwar Germany, the town was the site of a concentration camp for unwanted Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. During World War II, a Nazi prison for women was operated in the city with multiple forced labour subcamps located both in the city and other places in the region. In the final weeks of the war, Cottbus was taken by the Red Army on 22 April 1945. From 1949 until German reunification in 1990, Cottbus was part of the German Democratic Republic (East Germany).”

Information about the Spremberger Turm – Wikipedia.

The plaque (“Honor and glory to the fighters Kapp and Luttwitz 15 March 1920.” Cottbus 10/19/2021) refers to the “Kapp Putsch, also known as the Kapp–Lüttwitz Putsch, named after its leaders Wolfgang Kapp and Walther von Lüttwitz, was an attempted coup against the German national government in Berlin on 13 March 1920. Its goal was to undo the German Revolution of 1918–1919, overthrow the Weimar Republic, and establish an autocratic government in its place. It was supported by parts of the Reichswehr, as well as nationalist and monarchist factions.” Kapp Putsch – Wikipedia

Inselteich and Tornower-Niederung

On the day of my birthday Marc and I toured the area around Lubben. We stopped for a mosquito laden picnic in the woods. A highlight for me was being able to get some photographs of Cranes in a field and Red Kites following a tractor in a field.

I wanted a photograph of this lovely mansion with a tower. I was only able to photograph the tower. I was chased off and told no photographs. The owner actually drove out in his car to make us leave. I was not standing in his property.

Near the end of the excursion, I made Marc stop the car. I saw a mushroom by the side of the road that was the size of a football. Wish I had known it was edible, I would have picked it and its companion for dinner.

The next to last photo shows a windfarm in the distance. Germany has loads of wind turbines.

Worlitzer

What a place! The follies, caves, grottos, waterways, ferries, bridges, and unique vistas are all superb. We didn’t arrive at Wurlitzer until the afternoon. I could have spent another day there. We had a nice dinner at Worlitzer Hof before driving home.

“The Dessau-Wörlitz Garden Realm, (German: Dessau-Wörlitzer Gartenreich) is a World Heritage Site in Germany, that lies between city of Dessau and the town of Wörlitz in Central Germany. It was designated world heritage in 2000. It is one of the first and largest English parks in Germany and continental Europe. It was created in the late 18th century under the regency of Duke Leopold III of Anhalt-Dessau (1740-1817), returning from a Grand Tour to Italy, the Netherlands, England, France and Switzerland he had undertaken together with his friend architect Friedrich Wilhelm von Erdmannsdorff. Strongly influenced by the ideals of The Enlightenment, they aimed to move on from the formal garden concept of the Baroque era in favor of a naturalistic landscape as they had seen at Stourhead Gardens and Ermenonville. Today the cultural landscape of Dessau-Wörlitz encompasses an area of 142 km2 (55 sq mi) within the Middle Elbe Biosphere Reserve in the German state of Saxony-Anhalt.” Source: Dessau-Wörlitz Garden Realm – Wikipedia

Schloss Lubbenau

The manor or castle at Schloss (Castle) Lubbenau is now a fancy hotel and restaurant. We spent an afternoon on our own and ate lunch there on October 14th.

“Surrounded by rivers, the nine-hectare Laridschaftgarten encloses the entire historic castle ensemble on natural pasture. The park is one of the early designs of English garden art in Lower Lusatia.”

Lubben Countryside

We went for a walk around Lubben with our family on October 12, 2021. The Fall weather was lovely.

Lubbenau

Lots sof charmign houses and waterways in Lubbenau, Germany.

Lübbenau – Wikipedia

Lübbenau is a town in the Upper Spree Forest-Lusatia District of Brandenburg, Germany. It is located in the bilingual German/Sorbian region of (Lower) Lusatia, on the river Spree, where this forms a large inland delta surrounded by woodland, called “Spree Forest”, about 82 km (51 mi) southeast of Berlin. The town is best known through the incorporated villages of Lehde/Lědy and Leipe/Lipje, villages where there just exist anabranches of the Spree River instead of streets.