GV Doors by Marc

Today I’m posting some Greenwich Village Doors photographed by Marc Felix. One mosoleum gate from Green-Wood in Brooklyn. The bulldog over the old stable used to be the emblem of Wells Fargo.

For Thursday Doors

Met Xmas

We went to the Metropolitan Museum of Art yesterday. Here’s a couple for Christmas. My goal is to say something nice to strangers and spread good cheer. We are all in this together.

Green-Wood and Manhattan Doors

Doors in Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, and in Greenwich Manhattan with a couple of lamps thrown in.

For Thursday Doors December 16, 2021.

Leroy Street

Near the Hudson River on Leroy Street is a new building. I stopped to photograph the door and tree. The doorman came out and told me not to take photographs. I told him it is legal to take photographs of places if you are standing on public property.

I threw in the two trees for extras.

For Thursday Doors December 9, 2021.

Worlitzer and Glasshutte Doors

The ABF (ABF (Absolute bloody final) as they used to say in British Pubs) of my posts on Germany.

For Dan’s Thursday Doors December 2, 2021

German Doors

Mixed locations in Germany: Dessau, Inselteich, Cottbus and Lübben. My daughter-in-law Heike used to work at the place in the first photo long ago. Marc thought it would be fun to own the house in the last two photographs.

Happy Thanksgiving to all.

For Thursday doors November 25, 2021.

Wittenberg Doors

Every town we went to in Germany has great doors. We stayed at Pension Nord (door shown below) for two days in Dessau while visiting Heike’s family. While in Dessau we drove to the historic town of Lutherstadt Wittenberg, which is 35 km or 22 miles from there.

This post is for Thursday Doors November18.

Cranach-Hofe

The Cranachhöfe documents the work of Lucas Cranach the Elder, Lucas Cranach the Younger, Hans Cranach,Augustin Cranach and Lucas Cranach III in Wittenberg. The building at Markt 4 and the pharmacy with courtyard at Schlossstraße 1 is where Lucas Cranach and his descendants lived and worked. Lucas Cranach the Elder had set up the printing room in the Cranachhof in the once famous printing town of Wittenberg. He printed the 95 Theses, the first part of the Luther Bible, Luther’s table speeches and numerous woodcuts were printed there too. After the reconstruction of the Cranachhöfe, a historic printing room was again set up in Schlossstrasse, in which texts (Luther’s table speeches) and illustrations (in linocut) are now produced using the book high-print process. On special occasions, the historic Gutenberg Press at Cranachhof Markt 4 will be activated to demonstrate how printing was done during the Middle Ages.

For some of his artwork see Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472–1553) in the Lucas Cranach Digital Archive. I like his partridges (with audio) shown at Lucas Cranach the Elder | Dresden | The Morgan Library. Here’s the site for The Cranach Foundation (cranach-stiftung.de) with loads information on the history of the two houses and the exhibits.

I thoroughly enjoyed Wittenberg. It is well worth a visiting. It would be nice to see more of it someday.