Wood Siding

A couple of old houses

The late 18 c. or early 19th 121 Charles Street (link: brick underground.com) has a fascinating history. GVHS also has an excellent write-up on 121 Charles Street.

Ac cross the street from 121 is a building with a huge roof garden. I love how it spills over the walls.

132 Charles Street was built in the 1899. Both these old houses have wooden sidings, as do a only a few others in Greenwich Village.

Lonely Streets

Seeing the shops boarded up and few people around it feels almost deserted. I thought it strange to see the cellist returned to his usual spot pre-pandemic.

Westbeth for artists is also in the Village. Part of the old High Line is shown here. Check out the link for history.

Charles lane is near the Hudson River in Greenwich Village. “Only one tangible remnant of the Newgate Prison still exists today, the narrow, sidewalk-absented Charles Lane, which marked the northern boundary of the prison property. It appears on this 1885 map, but the City officially mapped it on official records beginning in 1893, when it gained its unusual brick paving.

Charles and Christopher Streets are named for the same man, Charles Christopher Amos, a landowner who had inherited part of Sir Peter warren’s massive Greenwich Village estate in the colonial era. Unusually, the streets were named Christopher, Amos, Charles going north; Amos was renamed West 10th Street as far back as the 1840s.” (source: Forgotten NY) See the old photos and details in Forgotten NY.

Jefferson Market Garden

I’ve been entertaining myself with tutorials on two Photoshop Panels, The Zone System and Palette Effects by Blake Rudis at the F64 Elite Academy.

The first two images are the results of my first dabble with it. Three and four are before editing. I like the rich and colorful results.

Chumley’s Doors

Chumley’s is a historic pub and former speakeasy at 86 Bedford Street between Grove and Barrow Streets in Greenwich Village, New York City. It was established in 1922 by the socialist activist Leland Stanford Chumley, who converted a former blacksmith’s shop near the corner of Bedford and Barrow Streets into a Prohibition-era drinking establishment. The speakeasy became a favorite spot for influential writers, poets, playwrights, journalists, and activists, including members of the Lost Generation and the Beat Generation movements.

Chumley’s has no exterior sign. It’s located at the end of a nondescript courtyard (“The Garden Door”), while the Bedford Street entrance, which opens to the sidewalk, is also unmarked. Inside, Chumley’s is still equipped with the trap doors and secret stairs that composed part of its elaborate subterfuge.

The term “86” may have originated when an unruly guest was escorted out of the 86 Bedford St. door. A different version in Jef Klein’s book The History and Stories of the Best Bars of New York: “When the cops would very kindly call ahead before a [prohibition-era] raid, they’d tell the bartender to ’86’ his customers, meaning they should exit via the 86 Bedford door, while the police would come to the Pamela Court entrance.”

A 9/22/2020 Literary Landmarks Register plaque describes Chumley’s as: A celebrated haven frequented by poets, novelists, and playwrights, who helped define twentieth century American literature. These writers include Willa Cather, E.E. Cummings, Theodore Dreiser, William Faulkner, Ring Lardner, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Eugene O’Neill, John Dos Passos, and John Steinbeck.

Posted on the walls of Chumley’s were the covers of books supposedly worked on there. Owing to its historical significance, Chumley’s is a stopping-place for various literary tours.

The building that houses Chumley’s is linked to four others, all damaged since the wall collapse in 2007. Several buildings are completed and are now condominiums. The space that housed Chumley’s needed to obtain a new permit before it could re-open as a bar (New York Times of December 31, 2012).

Chumley’s re-opened on October 18, 2016 as a reservations-only dinner restaurant featuring upscale bar food and “mixology” drinks. The dining room is about 10% smaller in height and width than it was, and the “Garden Door” is permanently closed. The new owner is Alessandro Borgognone, who also owns the nearby Sushi Nakazawa. (source: Wikepedia)