Central Park April 18

The third bird down is a composite image.

Palm Warbler, Central Park 4/18/2017
Palm Warbler, Central Park 4/18/2017
Yellow-rumped Warbler, Central Park 4/18/2017
Yellow-rumped Warbler, Central Park 4/18/2017
Yellow-rumped Warbler, Central Park 4/18/2017
Yellow-rumped Warbler, Central Park 4/18/2017

Snake's Head Fritillary, Central Park 4/18/2017 Snake’s Head Fritillary, Central Park 4/18/2017[/caption]

Sessile-flowered Wake-robin, Central Park 4/18/2017
Sessile-flowered Wake-robin, Central Park 4/18/2017
Daffodil, Central Park 4/18/2017
Daffodil, Central Park 4/18/2017
Red Tulips, Central Park 4/18/2017
Red Tulips, Central Park
Yellow Tulips, Central Park 4/18/2017
Yellow Tulips, Central Park 4/18/2017

Central Park Spring Flowers

Photographed using a Nikon D750 with a Sigma 150-600 mm lens in Central Park Tuesday April 11. I find that my big lens can work a lot like a macro.

Virginia Bluebell, Central Park 4/11/2017
Virginia Bluebell, Central Park 4/11/2017
Rhododendron. Central Park 4/11/2017
Rhododendron. Central Park 4/11/2017
Chinese Barberry, Central Park 4/11/2017
Chinese Barberry, Central Park 4/11/2017
Peach, Central Park 4/11/2017
Peach, Central Park 4/11/2017
Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis, Central Park 4/11/2017
Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis, Central Park 4/11/2017

Central Park Birds Wednesday

I actually photographed these on Tuesday April 11 in Central Park and processed them next day. So the title is not totally wrong.

One of those lucky shots.

Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Central Park 4/11/2017
Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Central Park 4/11/2017

The Red-headed Woodpecker has been there all winter but I was unable to get to that part of the park to see it until now. A terrible bunch of photos of it, but they are mine.

Red-headed Woodpecker, Cnetral Park 4/12/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker, Cnetral Park 4/12/2017

Late Spring Birds

A selection of birds from March photographed in Central Park.

Song Sparrow, Central Park 3/29/2017
Song Sparrow, Central Park 3/29/2017 version 2

The Phoebe was hanging out at Turtle Pond. I didn’t get a close shot of it.

Woodcock Fall

A Group of Woodcocks (aka Timberdoodle) is called a Fall. New York City just experienced a massive fallout of a huge Fall of Woodcocks after the snow storm. The last couple of days were great days for birders. I saw more Woodcock yesterday in Central Park than I have ever seen in my entire life, 11 of perhaps hundreds. I also saw a Wilson’s Snipe. It isn’t so good for the Woodcocks. The poor Woodcocks were not expecting a snow storm to get in the way of their migration: Many have died hitting buildings; hawks and falcons are dining on them; and cold is also a problem. They have been seen huddled together, probably to stay warm. Normally I rarely see any because they are so well camouflaged. They sure stand out against the snow. In Central Park they are hanging out by streams looking for food. I hope they survive and continue north to breed soon.

If you find an injured Woodcock put it in a paper bag and get it to a bird rehabilitator, like the Wild Bird Fund in NYC. See what to do with an injured bird. Their beaks are delicate and they need to be in something soft like a bag. More about Woodcocks at Cornell.

An Early Bird Gets Caught in the Snowstorm, New York Times March 17, 2017

Also see American Woodcock Event in Central Park March 15 – 17, 2017 by Anders Peltomaa. I created and maintain the Linnaean Society of NY’s website.

American Woodcock, Central Park 7/16/2017
American Woodcock, Central Park 7/16/2017

Woodcock in a stream in Central Park

Against snow

The Wilson’s Snipe