Central Park December Birds

An eruptive species, the Red-breated Nuthatch, has been spotted in Central Park..I saw one one at the feeders in the Ramble, December 26, 2016.

Red-breased Nuthatch, Central Park 12/26/2016
Red-breased Nuthatch, Central Park 12/26/2016

For comparrison:

White-breased Nuthatch, Central Park 12/26/2016
White-breased Nuthatch, Central Park 12/26/2016

Black-capped Chickadee, Downy Woodpecekr and Tufted Timouse where a few of the other birds enjoying the peanut buttter mix:

Not so Darling Starlings

These rascals, who strut around like little Mafioso, converge on diners at the Boat House in Central Park and the minute a person isn’t looking they steal their food.
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Common Starling, Central Park 10/28/2016
Common Starling, Central Park 10/28/2016
Common Starling, Central Park 10/28/2016
Common Starling, Central Park 10/28/2016

Starlings are very smart and are mimics. I read a charming little book about one called Arnie, the Darling Starling: Margarete Sigl Corbo, Diane Marie Barras, Leslie Morrill: Amazon Books:

“The true story of a talking starling and the grandmother who raised him is as heartwarming a book as you will ever read. When Margarete first came upon Arnie, he was just a familiar springtime sight: a baby bird lying helpless in the daisy patch. After unsuccessfully trying to return him to his nest, she took him into her Texas home and raised him as carefully as she had raised her own child, teaching him to perch, to fly, even to talk. Arnie resisted all attempts to restore him to the wild, preferring steak and canned corn to worms, which frightened him, and even developing a taste for wine. Arnie is full of life, laughter, and love. It is a completely irresistible book.”

The spectacular aerial feat that a murmuration of starlings performs (Video by Dylan Winter):

Eugene Schiefelin, a member of The Acclimatization Society, wanted to introduce all the birds mentioned in Shakespeare. He released about a hundred starlings in New York City’s Central Park in 1890 and 1891. By 1950 starlings could be found coast to coast, north past Hudson Bay and south into Mexico. Today their North American numbers are over 200 million. (Source: “Call of the Reviled” Scientific American).

Kinglets

I was able to spend a couple of hours in the park and managed to capture a couple of Kinglets (Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned). They are such fun to watch. These tiny acrobatic birds flit about so fast they are hard to photograph. Every click of the shutter found them in a new position.

Insects and

I went to Central Park with only my Nikor-Micro f2.8 105mm G lens on my D750 to photograph small things. After throwing out almost all of them I am left with these. I apologize for the poor quality of a few but I included them because I am so proud of myself for identifying them.