Lahaina Maui

We enjoyed the old buildings and history in Lahaina on our second day in Maui. See Flag of Hawaii – Wikipedia. We met Marc’s cousin Margaret and her mate there for lunch. Most of the shops along Front Street are tacky.

Lahaina in Maui Doors

This is the first of many posts from our vacation in Maui, Hawaii in November 2022. I read James Mitchener’s Hawaii before our trip. That long and detailed book filled me in on all the history. The Baldwins were missionaries. They lived in Lahaina.

For Thursday Doors

Captain Timothy Hill House

A bit of history.: Home (captaintimothyhillhouse.com and Assateague Lighthouse – Public tours (assateagueisland.com)

Cold Spring and Cove Neck

Cold Spring Harbor, Nassau County, Long Island, NY About The Village | Cold Spring, NY was the start of a lovely day. We ate lunch at a lovely restaurant, the Harbor Mist, by Oyster Bay inlet on the Long Island Sound. There is a little park there dedicated to Billy Joel. Cold Spring Harbor was the name of Billy Joel’s first album in November 1, 1971.

Next we drove to Cove Neck on the opposite shore to see Sagamore Hill. Sagamore Hill was the home of Theodore Roosevelt, 26th President of the United States, from 1885 until his death in 1919. There is lots of history and pictures at the Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, NPS site. I installed The NPS App – Digital (U.S. National Park Service) app and watched VR tours of Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.

Museumdorf Glashutte

Spent a lovely day at a historic village that was a major glass manufacturing center. It was fun watching a glass blower at work. Museumsdorf Glashütte – Crafts, Culture and History (museumsdorf-glashuette.de)

Cottbus

We went with the family to Cottbus. We saw an art museum there with lovely art about miners. No photographs allowed. The town has an intersting history.

The following is from Wikipedia (Cottbus – Wikipedia). “Cottbus is a university city and the second-largest city in Brandenburg, Germany. Situated around 125 km (78 mi) southeast of Berlin, on the River Spree, Cottbus is also a major railway junction with extensive sidings/depots. Although only a small Sorbian minority lives in Cottbus itself, the city is considered as the political and cultural center of the Sorbs in Lower Lusatia.

The settlement was established in the 10th century, when Sorbs erected a castle on a sandy island in the River Spree. The first recorded mention of the town’s name was in 1156. In the 13th century German settlers came to the town and thereafter lived side by side with the Sorbs. In the Middle Ages Cottbus was known for wool, and the town’s drapery was exported throughout Brandenburg, Bohemia (Czechia) and Saxony. In 1445 Cottbus was acquired by the Margraviate of Brandenburg from Bohemia. In 1514 Jan Rak founded the Universitas Serborum, a Sorbian gymnasium, in the city. In 1701 the city became part of the Kingdom of Prussia. It was also ruled by Saxony between 1807 and 1813. In 1815 the surrounding district of Lower Lusatia was ceded by the Kingdom of Saxony to Prussia, and in 1871 it became part of the German Empire. According to the Prussian census of 1905, the city of Cottbus had a population of 46,270, of which 97% were Germans, 2% were Sorbs and 1% were Poles.

In interwar Germany, the town was the site of a concentration camp for unwanted Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. During World War II, a Nazi prison for women was operated in the city with multiple forced labour subcamps located both in the city and other places in the region. In the final weeks of the war, Cottbus was taken by the Red Army on 22 April 1945. From 1949 until German reunification in 1990, Cottbus was part of the German Democratic Republic (East Germany).”

Information about the Spremberger Turm – Wikipedia.

The plaque (“Honor and glory to the fighters Kapp and Luttwitz 15 March 1920.” Cottbus 10/19/2021) refers to the “Kapp Putsch, also known as the Kapp–Lüttwitz Putsch, named after its leaders Wolfgang Kapp and Walther von Lüttwitz, was an attempted coup against the German national government in Berlin on 13 March 1920. Its goal was to undo the German Revolution of 1918–1919, overthrow the Weimar Republic, and establish an autocratic government in its place. It was supported by parts of the Reichswehr, as well as nationalist and monarchist factions.” Kapp Putsch – Wikipedia

Cranach-Hofe

The Cranachhöfe documents the work of Lucas Cranach the Elder, Lucas Cranach the Younger, Hans Cranach,Augustin Cranach and Lucas Cranach III in Wittenberg. The building at Markt 4 and the pharmacy with courtyard at Schlossstraße 1 is where Lucas Cranach and his descendants lived and worked. Lucas Cranach the Elder had set up the printing room in the Cranachhof in the once famous printing town of Wittenberg. He printed the 95 Theses, the first part of the Luther Bible, Luther’s table speeches and numerous woodcuts were printed there too. After the reconstruction of the Cranachhöfe, a historic printing room was again set up in Schlossstrasse, in which texts (Luther’s table speeches) and illustrations (in linocut) are now produced using the book high-print process. On special occasions, the historic Gutenberg Press at Cranachhof Markt 4 will be activated to demonstrate how printing was done during the Middle Ages.

For some of his artwork see Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472–1553) in the Lucas Cranach Digital Archive. I like his partridges (with audio) shown at Lucas Cranach the Elder | Dresden | The Morgan Library. Here’s the site for The Cranach Foundation (cranach-stiftung.de) with loads information on the history of the two houses and the exhibits.

I thoroughly enjoyed Wittenberg. It is well worth a visiting. It would be nice to see more of it someday.

Wittenberg Market Square

Lutherstadt Wittenberg is a fascinating historical town and was the home of Martin Luther Martin Luther and the artist Lucas Cranach the Elder Lucas Cranach.

From Lutherstadt Wittenberg in Wikipedia: “Old Town Hall and Market Square. In the center of the old town is the generously dimensioned market square, where a harmonious ensemble of town houses has grown over centuries. On it are the Renaissance town hall, the monuments of Martin Luther (designed by Schadow) and Philipp Melanchthon as well as the market fountain. Since 2000, the city administration is in the former Tauentzienkaserne in Lutherstraße (New Town Hall), the town hall on the market square is called Altes Rathaus and has since served more representative purposes.”

It will a few more posts to share some of the photographs I made in Wittenberg on October 15, 2021.

In the top three photographs I replaced the skies.