Ted

For Memorial Day I honor my dad, Cdr. Theodore (Ted) Hechler, who was at Pearl Harbor during the bombing. His next a tour of duty was in the Pacific. He met my mother in Perth, Australia. She became the first war bride. He later flew PBY’s for the Navy in the Caribbean. He is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

See more about him on my site at sherryfelix.com/family/hechler-ww2…

193609 Ted at Annapolis 2
Ted at Annapolis, September 1936
194005 Ted Hechler post graduation at Annapolis 2
Ted Hechler post graduation at Annapolis, May 1945
phoenix
Ensign, Theodore was on the Pheonix at Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941
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Noel and Ted’s wedding in Pensecola, January 1, 1943

 

194907 Noel and Sherry (3)
Noel (mother) and Sherry, 1949
1957Ted-Hechler-Cdr
Cdr. Theodore Hechler, 1957

Raster Sherry

In 1999 I created a presentation for TAMS on digital images back in 1999. I had so much fun with it. I created masks of myself as Raster Sherry and Vicky Vector.

Outline of the presentaton:

  1. Raster and Vector:
    1. Digital images are either Raster or Vector.
    2. Vector to raster OK, but to make vector from raster RtV software is needed.
  2. File Types: Computer graphics come in a variety of files types:
    1. Raster File types: *.BMP, *.tiff, *.GIF, and *.JPEG to name a few.
    2. Vector file types: i.e., *.dxf, *.cdr, *.emf, *.svg and more
  3. Resolution effects output and file size and is measured in dpi, ppi and lpi.
    1. Computer monitors have their resolution and color settings (color depth).
      1. 1366×768 screen resolution with 24-bit color depth is now common.
      2. The output may be very different from the image seen on the computer.
    2. Scaling and resampling interpolation all effect images.
      1. 35 mm photo resolution is 200 dpi
  4. Color models include HSB, RGB and CMYK
    1. Color matching (for color depth see above).
    2. How different devices “see” color.
  5. Scanning and its effect on images.
    1. How a scanner scans.
    2. Histogram for B&W points, brightness and contrast.
    3. Moiré effect when scanning magazines (gaussian blur and unsharp mask).
  6. Printing: The quality of an image is affected by all the above.
    1. Types of Black and white are: laser, inkjet, and dot matrix.
    2. Inkjet or deskjet are color or grayscale.
    3. Dye sublimation prints are photorealistic
    4. Printing Press highest quality.

Digital Images slf is a PDF of the presentation updated today.

Irving Penn

I went to see a fabulous exhibit with the B&H Event Space group on May 23 at the Met museum: Irving Penn Centennial. Have a look at the whole set of prints and see how he developed as an artist Met: exhibitions objects.

Jeff L. Rosenheim, the chief Curator, generously gave us a half hour tour. His talk was very enlightening. The curator said Irving Pewnn printed limited runs, did all his own work and deliberately made the prints not the same. He was a workaholic and was always phtographing, printing or doing related work. Fashion photography was for cash, but that wasn’t his personal art. He trained as an artist and his sense of design shows in all he did. Apparently, his studio, was very raw and he made his clients pose the way he wanted them. For the series in Cusco he took over a local studio and paid the sitters; consequently, he had no shortage of models. He loved Matisse and knew him. His nude series explores shapes like Matisse did. I see Modigliani in them too. Rosenheim said most people didn’t like them. I like the series of flowers near the end of the exhibit. I love how he used positive and negative space and that all parts of the image are considered in the design.

After that we went to see some of his prints on sale at Pace/MacGill “Irving Penn 1950.” Also see the Pace/MacGill press release. I felt that the prints were not as good as the ones at the Met. The curators at the Met have first choice of the best of his prints and they chose well.

Irving Penn (June 16, 1917 – October 7, 2009) was an American photographer known for his fashion photography, portraits, and still lifes Wikipedia: Irving Penn.

Thank you Deborah Gilbert, B&H Event Producer, for making the event possible.

Here’s a couple of pics of Marc and I in front of Penn’s drop cloth at the Met.

Click images to view large the easy way

Many of us have this problem — the function to have single images open larger when clicking on it is not automatically created in the editor. Here are two methods to add a link to make the image open in a new window larger. If you get stuck contact WordPress support for help.

Easy way to make a single image open larger in the new WP editor:

link

  1. Upload an image, or a series of images as single images, (I make mine 1200 px on the wide side) and insert it/them into your post or select an exiting image while in edit mode then
  2. Click on the Insert/edit Link button (looks a little like a figure 8)
  3. Put a check in Open link in a new window/tab and
  4. Click Save.
  5. Update your post.

Open Link New Window

A slow way to make a single image open larger in WP Admin:

  1. Go to WP Admin
  2. Select Posts and
  3. Select the post you want to edit
  4. Click edit
  5. Select the image and then
  6. Click on the pencil icon that pops up at the top of the image
  7. In the image details window go to display settings and
  8. Select full size, and link to media file (this method can also be used to link to a page in your bog or somewhere else).
  9. Click Update.
  10. Update your post

I think it would be nice if WordPress applied these settings automatically on single image.

Example:

20150904_Hudson_02sf
Blue Light, Hudson River Park, March 2015