Cottbus

We went with the family to Cottbus. We saw an art museum there with lovely art about miners. No photographs allowed. The town has an intersting history.

The following is from Wikipedia (Cottbus – Wikipedia). “Cottbus is a university city and the second-largest city in Brandenburg, Germany. Situated around 125 km (78 mi) southeast of Berlin, on the River Spree, Cottbus is also a major railway junction with extensive sidings/depots. Although only a small Sorbian minority lives in Cottbus itself, the city is considered as the political and cultural center of the Sorbs in Lower Lusatia.

The settlement was established in the 10th century, when Sorbs erected a castle on a sandy island in the River Spree. The first recorded mention of the town’s name was in 1156. In the 13th century German settlers came to the town and thereafter lived side by side with the Sorbs. In the Middle Ages Cottbus was known for wool, and the town’s drapery was exported throughout Brandenburg, Bohemia (Czechia) and Saxony. In 1445 Cottbus was acquired by the Margraviate of Brandenburg from Bohemia. In 1514 Jan Rak founded the Universitas Serborum, a Sorbian gymnasium, in the city. In 1701 the city became part of the Kingdom of Prussia. It was also ruled by Saxony between 1807 and 1813. In 1815 the surrounding district of Lower Lusatia was ceded by the Kingdom of Saxony to Prussia, and in 1871 it became part of the German Empire. According to the Prussian census of 1905, the city of Cottbus had a population of 46,270, of which 97% were Germans, 2% were Sorbs and 1% were Poles.

In interwar Germany, the town was the site of a concentration camp for unwanted Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. During World War II, a Nazi prison for women was operated in the city with multiple forced labour subcamps located both in the city and other places in the region. In the final weeks of the war, Cottbus was taken by the Red Army on 22 April 1945. From 1949 until German reunification in 1990, Cottbus was part of the German Democratic Republic (East Germany).”

Information about the Spremberger Turm – Wikipedia.

The plaque (“Honor and glory to the fighters Kapp and Luttwitz 15 March 1920.” Cottbus 10/19/2021) refers to the “Kapp Putsch, also known as the Kapp–Lüttwitz Putsch, named after its leaders Wolfgang Kapp and Walther von Lüttwitz, was an attempted coup against the German national government in Berlin on 13 March 1920. Its goal was to undo the German Revolution of 1918–1919, overthrow the Weimar Republic, and establish an autocratic government in its place. It was supported by parts of the Reichswehr, as well as nationalist and monarchist factions.” Kapp Putsch – Wikipedia

Bescherbergwerk F60

We all went to see Bescherbergwerk F60, a historic coal mining structure in Lusatia. It was a bit more than I bargained for, the climb was too much. It has a total length of 502 meters, 204 meters wide and the height of almost 80 meters. I kept slipping on the wet platforms and stairs as we climbed.

Echo Canoe Launch at Croton Point

We stopped at Croton Point Park for lunch. Lunch was curtailed by bees so we decided to move on to the village of Cold Springs. On the way out of the park we stopped to see if there were any birds at the Echo Canoe Launch. There was only a mockingbird. I saw a sign there with a poster of The Hudson Valley Echoes written and illustrated by Theodore Cornu. I researched his name at home later and found more of his artwork (two included here). And I found an article about him which points out that he could be the father of the Environmental Movement. I paraphrased the article below.

Remembering Theodore Cornu

Theodore J. Cornu was born in New Jersey to a Swiss mother and father, who abandoned his mother and siblings. Cornu demonstrated an affinity for art and became employed as an “engrosser” in a Manhattan studio hand lettering diplomas and other documents. Canoeing was popular amongst his colleagues, which led him to the boating community in Ft. Washington. His love for canoeing fostered his interest in the Hudson River and Native American customs. He paddled up the Hudson to explore the Croton River.

Soon thereafter he met Anne Van Cortlandt. The two hit it off and he was able to rent The Ferry House on the shore adjacent to The Van Cortlandt Manor House. He became adept in the process of building canoes.

His activism emerged after years of enduring the oil slicks washing up the Croton River from the New York Central Railroad facility, where the waste from its cleaning procedures was discharged into the mouth of the Croton River. The fish caught in the river were said to smell and taste like oil. In 1933 Cornu enlisted the support of some fishermen in Crotonville to implore the State to pressure the railroad to clean up its act. They won.

By the late thirties, Cornu was a member of four canoeing associations. In 1936 he was involved in the founding of the Hudson River Conservation Society. His use of native American inspired environmental care and wisdom to foster environmental protection was uniquely his.

Cornu took on another fight in 1956. Westchester County’s used Croton the point as a malodorous dump. From 1926 on Cornu observed the loss of wetland bird habitat as the marshland filled with garbage. His led the initial salvo against the county, eventually dumping ceased 30 years later, in 1986 by order of the courts. 

In the 1987 in “The Art of River Saving,” an article in the ”Complete Revival Program” published by Clearwater stated that Cornu, deceased at age of 101 in 1986, “had perhaps the longest association with the Hudson River of any conservationist.

Most claim that the start of the Modern Environmental Movement began with the 1962 publication of Rachel Carson’s “Silent Spring”, or perhaps with the battle against Con Edison’s Storm King power proposal (fought from 1962-1980. 
The first Earth Day was celebrated on April 22, 1970, roughly a year after Cornu’s demise. By that time Cornu had been protesting and advocating for the environment for over 35 years. Cornu’s environmental activism pre-dates the Environmental Movement by decades. This calls for a re-examination of his place in environmental history.

Source: Remembering Theodore Cornu: Unacknowledged Father of Environmentalism – Hudson River Maritime Museum (hrmm.org) by Ken Sargeant, a Croton-based Brooklyn-born, photographer, environmentalist, and historian. Paraphrased by Sherry Felix.

Jetpack Search

Hi friends and followers. Today I installed a new search engine in my site here called Jetpack.
It will allow the user and I to search for anything or topic that I posted on my site.
Please test it out for me and give me your opinion. To use it type in the search bar at the right. You could type in “birds” or “digital art” as a test.

Georgia

My darling niece. It is hard to say this. She is gone. Our family is in shock over the sudden loss. Georgia’s anguish was too much for her to bear and she decided to end her time on Earth. She was a fun loving, vibrant, and caring girl. This is evident in her pictures. The few hours I spent with Georgia is worth a lifetime. Perhaps because I am a mother, I feel her loss more than my mother’s, who passed in October 2018. Georgia and her brother, Benjamin were very close and, I feel for him too. So many young lives are lost to suicide. We do our best; unfortunately, not all can be saved. Georgia is at peace now. Having these pictures helps me to treasure her memory.

Her uncle Marc wrote: “To paraphrase Elton John, ‘How wonderful when Georgia was in this world.’ Now there is a wound in my heart that will take a long time to heal.”

Six Select

I dug through my folders while house bound and came up with these six plant photographs I would like to show.

In case anyone finds this useful. My filing system for my over 100,000 images starts with folders named by location (USA, World, People, etc.) with sub folders by year. Inside the year folders are dated folders: YYYMMDD and subject. Inside those folders are folders called RAW, TIF, JPG, PSD – as needed. This folder structure works well in Lightroom as I can select by type of file easily. I use file names starting with YYYMMDD subject, and number. I also find files easily searching the added meta data of location and details on the subject. Using the date first in a file name means that files will will sort chronologically  in any computer system or app.

folders