Black & White Birds – CB&W

There are only a few of my bird photographs that translate well into black and white with some work in Photoshop. This group will be included in the Linnaean Society of New York‘s 2018-2019 Program which I am putting together now for September. I create their website and printed program in B&W — layout not content.

Great Egret (Ardea alba), Central Park 3/31/2018
Great Egret (Ardea alba), Central Park 3/31/2018
American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus), Central Park 3/31/2018
American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus), Central Park 3/31/2018
Red-winged Blackbird, Central Park 4/12/2018
Red-winged Blackbird, Central Park 4/12/2018
Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus), Central Park 4/14/2018
Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus), Central Park 4/14/2018
Blue-headed Vireo (Vireo solitarius), Central Park 5/3/2018
Blue-headed Vireo (Vireo solitarius), Central Park 5/3/2018
Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla), Central Park 5/8/2018
Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla), Central Park 5/8/2018
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum), Central Park 5/15/2018
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum), Central Park 5/15/2018

Cee's B&W Photo Challenge

Also for Cee’s Black and White Photo Challange

Daffodil – B&W

I converted this yellow daffodil in a recent post to black and white for Monochrome Madness March 31, 2016. I wanted it to have a slight sepia tone and look like an old etching, so I chose a flower with a plain background, intricate shapes, detail and texture.

Daffodil sp. Central Park 3/23/2016
Daffodil sp. as B&W sketch Central Park 3/23/2016

Chinatown Frog Pot

I originally made this photo in color on September 2011 at Mulberry Street, Chinatown, New York City and converted it to B&W for Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness on March 30, 2016.

Chinatown Frog Pot 9/25/2011
Chinatown Frog Pot 9/25/2011
Chinatown Frog Pot 9/25/2011
Original color version – Chinatown Frog Pot 9/25/2011

 

Birds in Autumn

I photographed these in my favorite place, Central Park, this September and October, 2015. I have been trying out the new Sigma 150-600 mm lens on my Nikon D750 — not bad at all. Then I processed them in Lightroom, Photoshop. And in some, using onOne, I added textures, shading and other tricks to create the mood I wanted. This is my creative outlet.

Doing these things to my photos means I will never be able to sell them as stock images. I hope someone will like one of my photographs well enough to want to buy one or two.