Central Park Birds Wednesday

I actually photographed these on Tuesday April 11 in Central Park and processed them next day. So the title is not totally wrong.

One of those lucky shots.

Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Central Park 4/11/2017
Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Central Park 4/11/2017

The Red-headed Woodpecker has been there all winter but I was unable to get to that part of the park to see it until now. A terrible bunch of photos of it, but they are mine.

Red-headed Woodpecker, Cnetral Park 4/12/2017
Red-headed Woodpecker, Cnetral Park 4/12/2017

Green-winged Teal

A Green-winged Teal is the last bird I saw in 2016 at the Pond at Central Park. Best wishes for a happy and productive year.

 

Central Park December Birds

An eruptive species, the Red-breated Nuthatch, has been spotted in Central Park..I saw one one at the feeders in the Ramble, December 26, 2016.

Red-breased Nuthatch, Central Park 12/26/2016
Red-breased Nuthatch, Central Park 12/26/2016

For comparrison:

White-breased Nuthatch, Central Park 12/26/2016
White-breased Nuthatch, Central Park 12/26/2016

Black-capped Chickadee, Downy Woodpecekr and Tufted Timouse where a few of the other birds enjoying the peanut buttter mix:

Pelican’s Belly Can

“A wonderful bird is the Pelican.
His beak can hold more than his belly can.
He can hold in his beak
Enough food for a week!
But I’ll be darned if I know how the hellican?”

A limerick by Dixon Lanier Merritt

I remember hearing this as a child. My memory was jogged by a post on Though Open Lens

White Pelican, Regents Park 12/31/15
White Pelican, Regents Park, London 12/31/15

Birds of London Winter 2015

This large post includes a list of the 61 birds including 7 life birds seen on this trip; bringing my UK list up to 261 since I started the list in 1987. I saw while in London late December 2015 and first week of January 2016. Captions provide the names, locations and dates of each siting. I posted the best ones but decided to include a few not so good photos as they are all I have of certain species.

My one serious trip was to the WWT London Wildlife Refuge on 1/4/2016. The WWT (Wildlife and Wetlands Trust has 8 other refuges around Great Britain. They cater to families, provide education and the wetlands have blinds for serious birders. I may not have found some of them, like the bittern and snipe, if other birders hadn’t pointed them out to me. My one disappointment was not having more days to do this. It was really a trip to visit family. Cemeteries are the best for birding. I enjoyed St James Park which is well stocked with ducks and pelicans.; and winter birds and ducks in and Clissold Park. Walthamstow Marshes might have produced some good birds but I didn’t get the time to investigate it.

Land Birds

Water Birds

2015-2016 UK Bird list
List of Birds seen by Sherry Felix

 

Sydney Land Birds

8th posting of photographs of Sydney August, 2015

The captions give the names and locations of these Australian bird photographs created August 2 to August 18, 2015.

Bashakill WMA by the Shawngunk Mountains

I went for a trip with 3 of my birding friends to Bashakill Wildlife Management Area, Sullivan County, New York on the weekend of June 6th. The first day we spent by the lake. The following morning I took some lovely photographs of dawn at the lake. Later that morning we drove up Gumaer Road, alongside a stream of the same name; stopping here and there to listen, and occasionally spot, an Acadian Flycatcher, singing Dark-eyed Juncos, Veerys and a Wood Thrush. I didn’t have my Nikon 80-400 mm lens, which is being repaired, so I am sorry to say I couldn’t photograph two young ravens being fed some red meat. Lastly, we walked along the D&H Canal Linear Park. The area is lovely and bright green this time of year with many birds, turtles and other wildlife. I had a marvelous time. We saw 55 species of birds and other flora and fauna.

I experimented with black and white with added sepia tints. Each one required its own methods to get the best result in Lightroom’s “darkroom” for translating to B&W. I aimed to create a mood and accentuate certain details. Here are both color and black and white versions for comparison.

Landscapes:

Close-ups:

Late Spring or Early Summer

A week ago it was spring now it is summer. Typical New York transition from spring to summer. BANG! It is hot. I had fun working these few images. Not much came out in focus recently. I think I need to get me big zoom lens checked out. These ones are OK. Some I worked on a bit on Photoshop and some I left alone.

Central Park at Dawn, 5/5/2015
Central Park at Dawn, 5/5/2015
Gray Catbird, Central Park 5/5/2015
Gray Catbird, Central Park 5/5/2015
Yellow-rumped Warbler, Central Park 4/28/2015
Yellow-rumped Warbler, Central Park 4/28/2015
Cape May Warbler, Central Park 5/5/2015
Cape May Warbler, Central Park 5/5/2015
Connecticut Warbler, Central Park 5/15/2015
Connecticut Warbler, Central Park 5/15/2015
American Redstart, Central Park 5/15/2015
American Redstart, Central Park 5/15/2015
Tulip Tree, Central Park 5/26/2015
Tulip Tree, Central Park 5/26/2015

Central Park Birds late April

Migration has been slow to start and the birds are few. We had a few specials. The Mourning Warbler, White-throated Sparrows and Blue Jay are locals. One somewhat controversial one was a Prothontary Warbler which was released by released in Central Park April 27, 2015 around 3:45 pm by the great staff of the Wild Bird Fund, in the vicinity of Tanner Spring. Reported by David Speiser. The argument is can it be counted as a wild bird. I thing, yes, as long as it recovers, feeds and continues its migration. I looks like it is feeding alright.