Central Park with LSNY

I attended a field trip for winter birds led by Richard Z. for The Linnaean Society of New York on Saturday. The write-up for the trip is on the LSNY site that I manage and designed for the organization.

I had fun embellishing these images.

Two rarities were a partially leucistic Grackle and a young Red-headed Woodpecker.

19 thoughts on “Central Park with LSNY

  1. Birder's Journey 2020-02-15 / 7:18 pm

    How lucky to see the Redheaded Woodpecker. I have yet to see one in real life☺️

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    • Sherry Felix 2020-02-16 / 7:41 am

      It isn’t a first for Central Park. In June of 2013 I photographed a gorgeous mature male in the Ramble. Another in April of 2017 west of the Carousel. This immature one is just north of the reservoir and has been there all winter. If he hangs out any longer we may get to see him mature.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. derrickjknight 2020-02-14 / 6:07 am

    Fascinating images – and thank you for leucistic which I had to look up.

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  3. mvschulze 2020-02-13 / 10:01 pm

    Stunningly beautiful images, particularly the Hooded Merganzer. Exceptional resolution. And the number of documented sightings registered by the Linnanen Societies field trips is most impressive. Naively, I confess to needing to look up leucistic regarding the Grackle. M 🙂

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    • Sherry Felix 2020-02-15 / 9:19 am

      So glad you enjoyed it. I love esoteric bird words. Superciliary is one of my favorites for describing avian eyebrows.

      Like

  4. Eunice 2020-02-13 / 6:03 pm

    I love these but the second shot just has to be my favourite, it’s fab 🙂

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  5. TCast 2020-02-13 / 4:02 pm

    Oh my, these are gorgeous, Sherry!

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  6. Jet Eliot 2020-02-13 / 3:38 pm

    It was a fun time experiencing the birds of Central Park here with you, Sherry. Each bird photo is a work of art, and I was especially impressed with the merganser photo. Such a stunning bird, and your photo in the colorful water is wonderful. Always interesting to see a bird with leucistic qualities, too.

    Like

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