Water Drops

It had recently rained when we went to the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx.

Water Drops NYBG 4/27/2017
Water Drops on Leaves NYBG 4/27/2017
Water Drops NYBG 4/27/2017
Water Drops on Leaves NYBG 4/27/2017
Water Drops NYBG 4/27/2017
Water Drops on Leaves NYBG 4/27/2017
Water Drops NYBG 4/27/2017
Water Drops on Cehrry NYBG 4/27/2017
Water Drops NYBG 4/27/2017
Water Drops on Tulip NYBG 4/27/2017
Water Drops NYBG 4/27/2017
Water Drops on Pansy NYBG 4/27/2017
Water Drops NYBG 4/27/2017
Water Drops on Leaves Tulip 4/27/2017

Charles St Doors

I chose a small selection of old houses on Charles Street between Washington and Greenwich Streets for this Thursday’s Doors.

Converted Stable 129 Charles Street 4/22/2017
Converted Stable 129 Charles Street 4/22/2017
Converted Stable 129 Charles Street 4/22/2017
Converted Stable 129 Charles Street 4/22/2017

The Federal red brick house at 131 Charles St is an example of an 1820’s was once a builder’s, carpenter’s, or stonemason’s home. There is a back house, #131-1/2, completely invisible from the street, accessible from the doorway at the left.  The photographer Diane Arbus lived in the converted stable.

131 Charles Street 4/22/2017
131 Charles Street 4/22/2017
131 Charles Street 4/22/2017
131 Charles Street 4/22/2017
131 Charles Street 4/22/2017
131 Charles Street 4/22/2017
131 Charles Street 4/22/2017
131 Charles Street 4/22/2017
131 Charles Street 4/22/2017
131 Charles Street 4/22/2017

135 Charles Street was originally the 9th Precinct, designed by John DuFais and built in 1897. About 1978 the Number 9 was converted to apartments.

131 and 133 Charles Street, a converted police station 4/22/2017
131 and 135 Charles Street, a converted police station 4/22/2017

Accross the street is…

132 Charles Street 4/22/2017
132 Charles Street 4/22/2017
132 Charles Street 4/22/2017
132 Charles Street 4/22/2017
132 Charles Street 4/22/2017
132 Charles Street 4/22/2017

I don’t like the modern building but the history is interesting.

134 Charles Street
134 Charles Street
Charles St Google Map
Charles St Google Map

West 28 St Cattle Egret

For the last week or so lone Cattle Egret has been at West 28th Street between 8 and 9th Avenues, Chelsea. This is a rare bird for New York City. Looks like it may have migrated a bit north of the usual breeding territory. The bird usually hangs out in a small fenced in area of grass, trees and flowers; and has been seen roosting on a balcony of the Penn South houses. This Cattle Egret mostly feeds on earth worms—lots of them.

Here it is catching a worm:

The blur is because it moves fast.

Other poses:

Note the orange breeding plumage.

Beresford Doors

The 23-story pre-war Beresford at 211 Central Park West (CPW) was designed by the architect Emery Roth and completed in 1929. It takes its name from the Hotel Beresford, which had occupied the site since 1889. Roth designed The El Dorado, The San Remo, and The Ardsley, also on CPW.

The Beresford’s mass is relieved by horizontal belt courses, staggered setbacks required by the 1916 Zoning Resolution, which provide some apartments with terraces, and Georgian style detailing. The Beresford sits on the corner and has three octagonal copper-capped corner towers. The view east overlooks Central Park; and the southern view is of Theodore Roosevelt Park, with the American Museum of Natural History. The building is U-shape, with a central court. Each floor originally had 2 apartments of a scale that was eliminated in NYC by the stock market crash and the Multiple Dwellings Law.

The co-op apartments can go for $3 million to $22 million. One unit was listed for $62 million. The building’s residents have included comedian Jerry Seinfeld, actress Glenn Close, singer Diana Ross, tennis player John McEnroe, and actor Tony Randall, to name a few.

20170411_Beresford (2)
Beresford door 4/11/2017
20170411_Beresford (1)
Berresfoird lamp 4/11/2017
20170411_Beresford (3)
Beresford side door 4/11/2017